Israel has successfully tested a rocket propulsion system for the second time in two months, the country’s Defence Ministry confirmed on Friday, adding that the test took place at a military base in central Israel.

READ ALSO: Israel unveils laser based missile interception system to replace Iron Dome

“The test was conducted at a military base in central Israel,” the ministry said.
The military noted that the test was scheduled in advance and was carried out as planned.

Israeli previously test a rocket propulsion system last December with Iran claiming it was a test of a nuclear weapon aimed at Tehran.

​In July, Israel and the United States held successful tests of their advanced Arrow 3 missile defence system in Alaska. The Arrow 3 weapon system, co-developed by Israel Aerospace Industries and Boeing, is in particular capable of intercepting missiles outside the atmosphere.

Israeli missile defence forces are armed with Patriot and Arrow weapon systems or previous modifications, as well as with the Iron Dome missile defence system, which is capable of intercepting short-range projectiles and rockets like Palestinian Grad or Qassam rockets.

The David’s Sling missile defence system is capable of intercepting missiles with a range from 70 to 300 kilometres (43-186 miles).

 

Source: Sputnik

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David’s Sling’s “Stunner” interceptor is also sold by Raytheon as PAAC-4 Skyceptor for the Patriot system. It’s pretty interesting since it fits into the short-ranged PAC-3 cannisters (16 per launcher) while it ranges 160km like the old PAC-2 (and you can only load 4 PAC-2 cannisters per launcher). The Stunner has other interesting features : – Dual IR + radar guidance – Re-locking on target if dodged or if it misses – Very low pricing : $350k… A 20km range PAC-3 costs $2M, a 35km range PAC-3 MSE costs $3M, a PAC-2 costs $4.5-6.5M… And Stunner/PAAC-4 is better than any… Read more »